Archivist Update: Early Air Pollution

In this addition of Archivist Update, we highlight an image depicting a college student wearing a gas mask as he “smells” a magnolia blossom in City Hall Park on Earth Day, April 22, 1970, in New York. AP Photographers have been documenting the world since the 1900s and AP’s groundbreaking photography has won 31 Pulitzer Prizes over the past 90 years. APImages.com is the definitive source for both current and historical photography, so feel free to browse AP’s historical image collections here.


 

Chemist Philip Sadtler of Philadelphia tests air as U.S. Public Health Service attempts to reproduce industrial conditions of smog which resulted in death of 22 persons in Webster, Pennsylvania and adjoining Donora last October. Watching Sadtler is young Bobby Natali, April 19, 1949. (AP Photo/Walter Stein)Chemist Philip Sadtler of Philadelphia tests air as U.S. Public Health Service attempts to reproduce industrial conditions of smog which resulted in death of 22 persons in Webster, Pennsylvania and adjoining Donora last October. Watching Sadtler is young Bobby Natali, April 19, 1949. (AP Photo/Walter Stein)

Only three buildings and several columns of smoke venture above this dense fog blanket which settled over Tulsa, Oklahoma, for a few minutes, reducing visibility to zero and tying up traffic, Jan. 15, 1944. The Mayor Hotel, center, is a 19-story structure. (AP Photo)Only three buildings and several columns of smoke venture above this dense fog blanket which settled over Tulsa, Oklahoma, for a few minutes, reducing visibility to zero and tying up traffic, Jan. 15, 1944. The Mayor Hotel, center, is a 19-story structure. (AP Photo)

In a laboratory test chamber, Phyllis Ullman, volunteer test subject, records her reactions in simulated smog conditions, while being observed by Paul L. Magill, Stanford University senior chemical engineer, through a window, April 19, 1949. Miss Ullman makes notes on eye and throat irritation as smog is introduced (center of picture). (AP Photo/Ernest K. Bennett)In a laboratory test chamber, Phyllis Ullman, volunteer test subject, records her reactions in simulated smog conditions, while being observed by Paul L. Magill, Stanford University senior chemical engineer, through a window, April 19, 1949. Miss Ullman makes notes on eye and throat irritation as smog is introduced. (AP Photo/Ernest K. Bennett)

Betty Cook, a lab assistant at the Stanford Research Institute, is shown taking a "blink test" as part of a project to study smog in Stanford, Calif. April 27, 1949. The test gauges eye irritation through photoelectric cells which record each blink of the eyes. The plastic helmet is filled with measured amounts of smog. Mrs. Cook wears glassless goggles which act as blink recorders. She reads a book to give uniform reaction conditions.The smog project is being conducted by the Air and Water Pollution Laboratory and Fumes of the Western Oil and Gas Association. (AP Photo/Ernest K. Bennett)Betty Cook, a lab assistant at the Stanford Research Institute, is shown taking a “blink test” as part of a project to study smog in Stanford, Calif. April 27, 1949. The test gauges eye irritation through photoelectric cells which record each blink of the eyes. The plastic helmet is filled with measured amounts of smog. Mrs. Cook wears glassless goggles which act as blink recorders. She reads a book to give uniform reaction conditions.The smog project is being conducted by the Air and Water Pollution Laboratory and Fumes of the Western Oil and Gas Association. (AP Photo/Ernest K. Bennett)

A gasoline station attendant on New York City’s Henry Hudson Parkway glances at his watch as he serves the last customer before the 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. curfew, Aug. 3, 1941. A sign reminds the inbound motorists that the station is to close during the 12-hour period in response to the government request that sales be suspended in eastern seaboard states. (AP Photo)A gasoline station attendant on New York City’s Henry Hudson Parkway glances at his watch as he serves the last customer before the 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. curfew, Aug. 3, 1941. A sign reminds the inbound motorists that the station is to close during the 12-hour period in response to the government request that sales be suspended in eastern seaboard states. (AP Photo)

Autos and trucks creep through low-hanging smoke and fog on the New Jersey Turnpike, Nov. 20, 1953. The smog, blanketing the heavily industrialized Elizabeth-Newark area for four days, has resulted in scores being treated for eye irritation and burning sensations in nose and throat. (AP Photo)Air Pollution 1953Autos and trucks creep through low-hanging smoke and fog on the New Jersey Turnpike, Nov. 20, 1953. The smog, blanketing the heavily industrialized Elizabeth-Newark area for four days, has resulted in scores being treated for eye irritation and burning sensations in nose and throat. (AP Photo)


 

 

Lead Image Caption: A Pace College student in a gas mask “smells” a magnolia blossom in City Hall Park on Earth Day, April 22, 1970, in New York. (AP Photo)

 

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